Embroidery So Detailed, You’d Swear They Are Actually Paintings

Vera Shimunia is a Russian artist based in Saint-Petersburg who does insane things with embroidery. With over two hundred and fifty thousand Instagram followers, her embroidering skills have gained Shimunia worldwide attention and a burgeoning Etsy shop. She refers to herself as a needle painter and that’s exactly what her pieces feel like, her needle works look like fully realized paintings. Shimunia says, “Most of all I love nature and believe in its power. So all [of] my pieces [have] its positive energy.” This is because all of her pieces are nature scenes. Nature scenes rendered in ecstatic, vibrant colors, finely detailed and often literally exploding up and out of the piece.

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Each and every miniature embroidered needle painting of Shimunia’s is gorgeous and mind blowing in an “I can’t believe that’s possible” kind of way. My favorite element of her works, beyond just how vividly colorful and detailed they are, is the tactile sense one gets when looking at photos of them. When I look at the scenes, I just want to run my fingers along them to feel each and every thread and the clouds that burst up and out of the frames. My favorite example of this is a scene she did of a field of flowers at sunset. She creates a colorful stream of pink, orange, yellow and blue flowers that stretch back towards the horizon of the scenery. In the sky above, Shimunia recreates one of those magical sunsets where those same colors of the flowers temporarily reflect through the clouds, making them look like different flavors of cotton candy. In Shimunia’s embroidery, she builds that same effect of cotton candy clouds with layered tufts of yarn that flow up and out of the piece, at the viewer, an effect that’s simultaneously placid and stimulating. Everything she does feels like it was produced with actual magical powers. Her expertise deserves follows and perusal of her Etsy shop post haste.

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Embroidery So Detailed, You’d Swear They Are Actually Paintings

Vera Shimunia is a Russian artist based in Saint-Petersburg who does insane things with embroidery. With over two hundred and fifty thousand Instagram followers, her embroidering skills have gained Shimunia worldwide attention and a burgeoning Etsy shop. She refers to herself as a needle painter and that’s exactly what her pieces feel like, her needle works look like fully realized paintings. Shimunia says, “Most of all I love nature and believe in its power. So all [of] my pieces [have] its positive energy.” This is because all of her pieces are nature scenes. Nature scenes rendered in ecstatic, vibrant colors, finely detailed and often literally exploding up and out of the piece.

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Each and every miniature embroidered needle painting of Shimunia’s is gorgeous and mind blowing in an “I can’t believe that’s possible” kind of way. My favorite element of her works, beyond just how vividly colorful and detailed they are, is the tactile sense one gets when looking at photos of them. When I look at the scenes, I just want to run my fingers along them to feel each and every thread and the clouds that burst up and out of the frames. My favorite example of this is a scene she did of a field of flowers at sunset. She creates a colorful stream of pink, orange, yellow and blue flowers that stretch back towards the horizon of the scenery. In the sky above, Shimunia recreates one of those magical sunsets where those same colors of the flowers temporarily reflect through the clouds, making them look like different flavors of cotton candy. In Shimunia’s embroidery, she builds that same effect of cotton candy clouds with layered tufts of yarn that flow up and out of the piece, at the viewer, an effect that’s simultaneously placid and stimulating. Everything she does feels like it was produced with actual magical powers. Her expertise deserves follows and perusal of her Etsy shop post haste.

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Vera Shimunia embroidery

Illustrating The Mundane

Ranganath Krishnamani is a designer and illustrator in Bagalore India who has worked with Adobe, Oracle, Redbus and as Creative Director for Liquidink Design in India. A skilled hand illustrator, Krishnamani’s work tends towards a more minimalistic, digital finish, largely depicting everyday scenes with special attention paid to the lighting. He used this focus on lighting as the running thread in a recent series of work called, Everyday Musings.

Illustration of people lighting a candle in a field

Sketch of people lighting a candle in a field

Krishnamani used the everyday scenes of Bangalore, the ones that made him stop and think and sparked some kind of inspiration, as the subject of this series. He calls them “mundane everyday happenings…while waiting in the long traffic lights, or by the side of the road” and on his trips throughout Bangalore. He says that over the course of the series, a single source of light, “is intended to add drama and illuminates the subjects.” Each piece is accompanied by a description which gives the viewer an insight into what about the scene in his experience inspired him to illustrate it. One of my favorites, with the included context of the artist, is a piece from the point of view of the backseat passenger in a taxi cab. The driver’s face is obscured so that all the figure really is, is a shadow with an earbud hanging out of it. There is a religious and cultural shrine on the dashboard of the cab and the piece is ascribed to this “vantage point into peoples faith, culture and aesthetic choices from the back seat of a taxi cab.” The pieces are very straightforward in that way, self professed mundane scenes. Their value lies in the point of view of the artist, the meaning ascribed to the scenes by the artist portraying them and how that is communicated to the viewer. It’s a perfect window into everyday life in Bangalore all transmitted with deft skill and perspective.

Illustration of a man holding a bunch of balloons

Sketch of a man holding a bunch of balloons

Illustration of people lighting candles

Sketch of people lighting candles

Illustration of people lighting lanterns

Sketch of people lighting lanterns

Illustrating The Mundane

Ranganath Krishnamani is a designer and illustrator in Bagalore India who has worked with Adobe, Oracle, Redbus and as Creative Director for Liquidink Design in India. A skilled hand illustrator, Krishnamani’s work tends towards a more minimalistic, digital finish, largely depicting everyday scenes with special attention paid to the lighting. He used this focus on lighting as the running thread in a recent series of work called, Everyday Musings.

Illustration of people lighting a candle in a field

Sketch of people lighting a candle in a field

Krishnamani used the everyday scenes of Bangalore, the ones that made him stop and think and sparked some kind of inspiration, as the subject of this series. He calls them “mundane everyday happenings…while waiting in the long traffic lights, or by the side of the road” and on his trips throughout Bangalore. He says that over the course of the series, a single source of light, “is intended to add drama and illuminates the subjects.” Each piece is accompanied by a description which gives the viewer an insight into what about the scene in his experience inspired him to illustrate it. One of my favorites, with the included context of the artist, is a piece from the point of view of the backseat passenger in a taxi cab. The driver’s face is obscured so that all the figure really is, is a shadow with an earbud hanging out of it. There is a religious and cultural shrine on the dashboard of the cab and the piece is ascribed to this “vantage point into peoples faith, culture and aesthetic choices from the back seat of a taxi cab.” The pieces are very straightforward in that way, self professed mundane scenes. Their value lies in the point of view of the artist, the meaning ascribed to the scenes by the artist portraying them and how that is communicated to the viewer. It’s a perfect window into everyday life in Bangalore all transmitted with deft skill and perspective.

Illustration of a man holding a bunch of balloons

Sketch of a man holding a bunch of balloons

Illustration of people lighting candles

Sketch of people lighting candles

Illustration of people lighting lanterns

Sketch of people lighting lanterns

Mind-bending, Unsettling, Cheeky and Cute Illustrations

Alice Lin is an accomplished painter based out of Beijing, China. In her work as a painter and as a freelance artist, Lin draws inspiration from traditional sources as well as more fantastic sources, the “fascinating wonderland,” as she puts it, “of possible realities combine[d] with the human figure, plants, animals into a singular, calm, dark vision.” A recent series, A Moony Night, posted on Behance, shows Lin bringing her mission statement to wondrous life.

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

The series, produced with traditional Chinese paints on silk, begins with a word from the artist. Here she describes the meaning of moony night for her as being “about empowerment in a soothing way.” The series, for Lin, is an attempt to give the viewer a sense of that empowerment. She achieves this through this wild cross section between Salvador Dali and Alice in Wonderland, as though Dali came along and produced a series inspired by Alice’s adventures. It’s a strange alchemy that creates precisely the sense of “calm, dark vision,” that Lin professes to be after. The series follows an adorable rabbit, placid in the face of bizarre, increasingly dark surroundings and pooling waters, melting daisies, chopped off heads of flowers, a potentially murderous flamingo and the absence of its body as its own eyes warp into Daliesque puddles in its dismembered head. And all of them are rendered in through traditional means. The overall effect is mind-bending, unsettling, cheeky and cute. All at the same time.

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images sketchbook

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

 

 

 

Mind-bending, Unsettling, Cheeky and Cute Illustrations

Alice Lin is an accomplished painter based out of Beijing, China. In her work as a painter and as a freelance artist, Lin draws inspiration from traditional sources as well as more fantastic sources, the “fascinating wonderland,” as she puts it, “of possible realities combine[d] with the human figure, plants, animals into a singular, calm, dark vision.” A recent series, A Moony Night, posted on Behance, shows Lin bringing her mission statement to wondrous life.

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

The series, produced with traditional Chinese paints on silk, begins with a word from the artist. Here she describes the meaning of moony night for her as being “about empowerment in a soothing way.” The series, for Lin, is an attempt to give the viewer a sense of that empowerment. She achieves this through this wild cross section between Salvador Dali and Alice in Wonderland, as though Dali came along and produced a series inspired by Alice’s adventures. It’s a strange alchemy that creates precisely the sense of “calm, dark vision,” that Lin professes to be after. The series follows an adorable rabbit, placid in the face of bizarre, increasingly dark surroundings and pooling waters, melting daisies, chopped off heads of flowers, a potentially murderous flamingo and the absence of its body as its own eyes warp into Daliesque puddles in its dismembered head. And all of them are rendered in through traditional means. The overall effect is mind-bending, unsettling, cheeky and cute. All at the same time.

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images sketchbook

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

Alice Lin - Alice in Wonderland style images

 

 

 

A Look Inside Julie Benbassat’s Sketchbook

Julie Benbassat is a well established illustrator from the United States, working from Providence, Rhode Island as a freelancer. She has been featured by Paste Magazine, been the illustrator for the Brown Political Review and worked with clients like BOOM! Comics, Cartoon Network, Harmonix and The National Park Service. Her work is always filled with life and color. Her variant covers for the Season 11 Adventure Time comics is an absolute joy to look at with her use of more detailed, stylized figures, giving the outlandish fantasy a greater sense of reality that is both eery and child-like, capturing the spirit of the material beautifully. Looking further through Benbassat’s website allows the opportunity for an intimate look into the process her work goes through with her ‘Sketchbook Collection 2017.’

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

This particular series shows a collection of sketches Benbassat made across multiple sketchbooks in 2017. Here, she gives the viewer a raw look at the births of some her joyously fantastical works. My favorite element of the sketches are the unprocessed, hand colored sketches. Benbassat’s hand with coloring walks this uncanny valley between muted and vivid, deep/saturated colors that evokes some of the classic work of Alan Moore’s collaborators on V For Vendetta and Watchmen. Containing many test sketches for her already known, finished works, shows an artist of great talent going through her process and demonstrating just how much goes into each piece while also providing unique perspectives with which to appreciate the various elements of Benbassat’s artwork and artwork in general.

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

A Look Inside Julie Benbassat’s Sketchbook

Julie Benbassat is a well established illustrator from the United States, working from Providence, Rhode Island as a freelancer. She has been featured by Paste Magazine, been the illustrator for the Brown Political Review and worked with clients like BOOM! Comics, Cartoon Network, Harmonix and The National Park Service. Her work is always filled with life and color. Her variant covers for the Season 11 Adventure Time comics is an absolute joy to look at with her use of more detailed, stylized figures, giving the outlandish fantasy a greater sense of reality that is both eery and child-like, capturing the spirit of the material beautifully. Looking further through Benbassat’s website allows the opportunity for an intimate look into the process her work goes through with her ‘Sketchbook Collection 2017.’

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

This particular series shows a collection of sketches Benbassat made across multiple sketchbooks in 2017. Here, she gives the viewer a raw look at the births of some her joyously fantastical works. My favorite element of the sketches are the unprocessed, hand colored sketches. Benbassat’s hand with coloring walks this uncanny valley between muted and vivid, deep/saturated colors that evokes some of the classic work of Alan Moore’s collaborators on V For Vendetta and Watchmen. Containing many test sketches for her already known, finished works, shows an artist of great talent going through her process and demonstrating just how much goes into each piece while also providing unique perspectives with which to appreciate the various elements of Benbassat’s artwork and artwork in general.

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

Julie Benbassat sketchbook

Making Use of Color To Present a Sketchbook in an Interesting Way

Kachmarska Ira is an illustrator and architect out of Lviv, Ukraine. This burgeoning artist recently shared her sketchbook for 2018, revealing a new tendency towards color in her impressive, growing body of work. Previous work from Kachmarska has always shown a run of minimalism towards the use of color, relying largely on the play between swaths of black, the natural grain of the medium used and an accent of one shade of red or yellow. Her illustrations from 2018 show Ira leaving behind her attachment for black backgrounds and introduces new, dominant base colors to her skilled line work.

Ultra magenta drawing on sketchbook

Ira’s new affinity for color captures a greater sense of melancholic whimsy that beforehand had been far less pronounced, more dominated by melancholy. The inclusion of dominant colors influences the spirit of each of Ira’s pieces in the sketchbook. The first piece she presents depicts a scene of a melancholy woman with a long slender neck, standing in the foreground of a tree line, clouds overhead. A giraffe lurks through the trees as silhouette, kindred to the woman depicted here with her exaggerated neck. The trees, the clouds and the woman are all the grain of the medium Ira illustrated on. The rest of the space, the space surrounding the clouds and the trees, is all hand colored in giraffe yellow. It’s a whimsical package all-around with every element of the work influencing every other part, all of it dominated and determined by one specific color. As the sketchbook continues, Ira reveals a progression of scenes where this use of dominant color is played with and subverted. It makes the experience of viewing the series, one of exploration and discovery, constantly paying off.

Drawing of a girl with a long neck

Drawing of a woman in the forest

Purple drawing on purple pages sketchbook

Drawing of a factory

Drawing of a church in a sketchbook

 

 

 

Making Use of Color To Present a Sketchbook in an Interesting Way

Kachmarska Ira is an illustrator and architect out of Lviv, Ukraine. This burgeoning artist recently shared her sketchbook for 2018, revealing a new tendency towards color in her impressive, growing body of work. Previous work from Kachmarska has always shown a run of minimalism towards the use of color, relying largely on the play between swaths of black, the natural grain of the medium used and an accent of one shade of red or yellow. Her illustrations from 2018 show Ira leaving behind her attachment for black backgrounds and introduces new, dominant base colors to her skilled line work.

Ultra magenta drawing on sketchbook

Ira’s new affinity for color captures a greater sense of melancholic whimsy that beforehand had been far less pronounced, more dominated by melancholy. The inclusion of dominant colors influences the spirit of each of Ira’s pieces in the sketchbook. The first piece she presents depicts a scene of a melancholy woman with a long slender neck, standing in the foreground of a tree line, clouds overhead. A giraffe lurks through the trees as silhouette, kindred to the woman depicted here with her exaggerated neck. The trees, the clouds and the woman are all the grain of the medium Ira illustrated on. The rest of the space, the space surrounding the clouds and the trees, is all hand colored in giraffe yellow. It’s a whimsical package all-around with every element of the work influencing every other part, all of it dominated and determined by one specific color. As the sketchbook continues, Ira reveals a progression of scenes where this use of dominant color is played with and subverted. It makes the experience of viewing the series, one of exploration and discovery, constantly paying off.

Drawing of a girl with a long neck

Drawing of a woman in the forest

Purple drawing on purple pages sketchbook

Drawing of a factory

Drawing of a church in a sketchbook